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The Mercantile Navy List 1864
 
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 described the necessary requirements for a man to achieve, in order that he might be awarded a Certificate of Competency: -
Second Mate’s Certificate: - A Second Mate must be seventeen years of age, and must have been four years at sea. In Navigation: He must write a legible hand, and understand the first five rules of arithmetic and the use of logarithms. He must be able to work a day’s work complete, including the bearings and distance of the port he is bound to, by Mercator’s method; to correct the sun’s declination for longitude; and to find his latitude by meridian altitude of the sun; and work such other easy problems of a like nature, as may be put to him. He must understand the use of the sextant, and be able to observe with it, and read of the arc. In Seamanship: He must give satisfactory answers as to the rigging and unrigging of ships, stowing of holds &c.; must understand the measurement of the log-line, glass, and lead-line; be conversant with the rule of the road, as regards both steamers and sailing vessels, and the lights and fog signals carried by them.
Only Mate Certificate: - An Only Mate must be nineteen years of age, and have been five years at sea. In Navigation: In addition to the qualification required for a Second Mate, an Only Mate must be able to observe and calculate the amplitude of the sun, and deduce the variation of the compass therefrom, and be able to find the longitude by chronometer by the usual methods. He must know how to lay off the place of the ship on the chart, both by bearings of known objects, and by latitude and longitude. He must be able to determine the error of a sextant and adjust it, and find the time of high water from the known time at full and change. In Seamanship: In addition to what is required by a Second Mate, he must know how to moor and unmoor, and to keep a clear anchor, to carry out an anchor, to stow a hold, and make the requisite entries in the ship’s log. He will also be questioned as to his knowledge of the use and management of the mortar and rocket lines in the case of the stranding of the vessel, as explained in the official log book.
First Mate Certificate: - A First Mate must be nineteen years of age, and have served five years at sea, of which one year must have been as either Second or Only Mate, or as both. Service in a superior capacity is in all cases to be equivalent to service in an inferior capacity. In Navigation: In addition to the qualification required for an Only Mate, he must be able to observe azimuths and complete the variations; to compare chronometers and keep their rates, and find the longitude by them from an observation by the sun; to work to work the latitude by a single altitude of the sun off the meridian; and be able to use and adjust the sextant by the sun. In Seamanship: In addition to the qualifications necessary for an Only Mate, a more extensive knowledge of seamanship will be required, as to shifting large spars and sails, managing a ship in stormy weather, taking in and making sail, shifting yards and masts &c., and getting heavy weights, anchors, &c., in and out; casting ship on a lee-shore; and to secure the masts in the event of accident to the bowsprit.
Masters Certificate: - A Master must be at least twenty-one years of age, and have been six years at sea, of which one year must have been as First or Only Mate, and one year as Second Mate; or two years as First and Only Mate. Service in a superior capacity is in all cases to be equivalent to service in an inferior capacity. In addition to the qualification for a First Mate, he must be able to find the latitude by a star, &c. He will be asked questions as to the nature of the attraction of the ship’s iron upon the compass, and as to the method of determining it. He will be examined in so much of the Laws of the Tides as is necessary to enable him to shape a course, and to compare his surroundings with the depths marked on the charts. He will be examined as to his competency to construct rafts, and as to his resources for the preservation of the ship’s crew in the event of wreck. He must possess a knowledge of what he is required to do by law; as to entry and discharge, and the management of his crew; and as to penalties and entries to be made in the official log. He will be questioned as to his knowledge of invoices, charterparty, Lloyd’s agent, and as to the matters of bottomry; and he must be acquainted with the leading lights of the channel he has been accustomed to navigate, or which he is going to use.
 
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
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