ATOSSA
 
 
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864
 
The Agreement and Account of Crew covering this voyage showed that “The several persons whose names are hereto subscribed and whose descriptions are contained below, and of whom (as stated) are engaged as Sailors, hereby agree to serve on board the said Ship, in the several capacities expressed against their respective Names, on a voyage from Sunderland to Valparaiso with liberty to call at any Port or Ports in Chile, Peru, Bolivia, or United States of America, and back, to any Port in United Kingdom, or Continent of Europe, for orders as required – final port of discharge to be in the United Kingdom – duration of voyage about two years. And the said Crew agree to conduct themselves in an orderly, faithful, honest, and sober manner, and to be at all times diligent in their respective Duties, and, to be obedient to the lawful Commands of the said Master, or of any Person who shall lawfully succeed him, and of their Superior Officers, in everything relating to the said Ship and the Stores and Cargo thereof, whether on board, in boats, or on shore; in consideration of which Services to be duly performed, the said Master hereby agrees to pay to the Crew as Wages the Sums against their Names respectively expressed, and to supply them with Provisions according to the annexed Scale: And it is hereby agreed, That any Embezzlement or wilful or negligent Destruction of any part of the Ship’s Cargo or Stores shall be made good to the Owner out of the Wages of the Person guilty of the same: And if any Person enters himself as qualified for a duty which he proves incompetent to perform, his Wages shall be reduced in proportion to his in competency: And it is also agreed, That the Regulations authorized by the Board of Trade which in the paper annexed hereto are numbered _____ are adopted by the parties hereto, and shall be considered as embodied in this Agreement: And it is also agreed, That if any Member of the Crew considers himself to be aggrieved by any breach of the Agreement or otherwise, he shall represent the same to the Master or Officer in charge of the Ship in a quiet and orderly manner, who shall thereupon take such steps as the case may require: And it is also agreed That the Crew shall consist of Master, three apprentices and ten seamen, fourteen in number all told, All above extra.”
The Agreement was endorsed by William Hunter, Superintendent of the Port of Sunderland, who witnessed the signing on of the crew, their rates of pay and the arrangements that were made regarding their provisions during the voyage. Hunter also signed a paragraph on the Agreement that read “The Authority of the Owner or Agent for the allotments mentioned below is in my possession.”
The ‘Instructions To Masters’ printed on the Agreement read: - “Upon the arrival of the ship at any Foreign Port where there is a British Consular Office, or at any Port in any British Possession abroad, the Master is bound under a Penalty of Twenty Pounds to deliver within forty-eight hours of the Ship’s arrival (if the Ship remains forty-eight hours at the Port, and is not a passenger Ship), to the Consular Office, or the Chief Officer of Customs, the Agreement, and all Indentures and Assignments of Apprenticeships. These the Officer will keep during the Ship’s stay at the Port, and will, within a reasonable time before the Ship’s departure, return them to the Master, with a Certificate endorsed hereon stating when they were delivered and returned. Within forty-eight hours after the Ship’s arrival at her final port of destination in the United Kingdom, or upon the discharge of the Crew, whichever happens first, the Master is to deliver to the Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office the Agreement with a list of the Crew, and Official Log Book, and Accounts of the Wages and Effects of any Seaman or Apprentice who has died on board during the Voyage, whether he formed part of the Crew or not; and must hand over to the Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office any effects remaining unsold, together with the balance of wages or other monies belonging to any such Seaman or Apprentice. The Master should also deliver to the Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office the Certificates (Master, E2, or RV2) of any Seaman who has died or deserted during the Voyage, unless the same have been delivered up to a Consul or Officer in a British Possession abroad. Upon these being done, the Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office will give a Certificate for the purpose of clearance. The statement of the conduct, character, and qualifications of each member of the Crew formerly entered by the Master in the old List C. is to be entered in future in the Official Log Book as required by the 282d section of the Merchant Shipping Act.”
The crew’s wages were: -
 

RANK

MONTHLY WAGE

ADVANCE OF WAGES

MONTHLY ALLOTMENT

Mate

£6 0s 0d

£3 0s 0d

£3 0s 0d

Carpenter

£5 10s 0d

£2 15s 0d

£2 15s 0d

Steward

£2 10s 0d

£2 10s 0d

-

Cook

£3 5s 0d

£3 5s 0d

-

AB

£2 10s 0d

-

-

All OS except Forbes

£2 10s 0d

£2 10s 0d

-

OS : Forbes

 1s 0d

-

-

 
Each crew member was entitled to provisions on the following scale: -

1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ¼oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A weekly allowance of 1lb of sugar.
A daily allowance of sufficient water without waste.
Equivalent substitutes at the Master’s option.
No spirits were allowed on board.

On 6th November 1863, whilst at Dover, the Cook, Edward Bell is shown in the Agreement as having deserted the ship. Two other men are recorded as having joined ‘Atossa’ on the same day. Richard Tomlin, aged 20 years and John Gravener, aged 17 years, both born in Dover, signed on as Ordinary Seamen with a rate of pay set at £1 15s 0d per calendar month. One month’s money was advanced to each man before sailing. The signing on of both Tomlin and Gravener was endorsed by Joseph H. Henley who gave his occupation as Channel Pilot. The Agreement does not show who took on the role of Ship’s Cook.
By 12th February 1864, ‘Atossa’ had arrived in Valparaiso on the Pacific coast of Chile, having visited Coquimbo en route.


Map of Chile

In order to have reached Chile, ‘Atossa’ had negotiated her first passage around Cape Horn, the southernmost headland of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago of Chile. The journey took place during the southern hemisphere summer when winds would have been less severe; perhaps only gale-force strength for 5% of the time. The average annual temperature in the region is 5.2°C (41.4°F). Cloud cover is generally extensive and precipitation is high throughout the year. Difficult sailing conditions are created by fierce winds, strong east-to-west flowing currents and ice.

The Ships’ Agreement was deposited with the British Consul on 13th February 1864 and returned to the Ships Master on the 17th February 1864, when ‘Atossa’ left port.
 

Valparaiso
Valparaiso 1863 / 1864
Courtesy of Museo de Historia Natural de Valparaiso

Valparaíso is situated on the south side of a broad open bay, on the slopes of a curved spur of the coastal mountain range that ends in the rocky Point Angeles peninsula which provides good shelter from southerly and westerly winds but little to those from the north.
The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping at Foreign Ports’ manual of 1907 described “Valparaiso Bay in lat 33.1.53 S., long 73.38 W . . . a most convenient place to call for vessels in search of employment. Charters are obtainable . . . for productions . . . such as nitrate, guano, sugar, cotton, wool, etc. Vessels entering Valparaiso Bay should not approach Angeles Point to a less distance than 4 cables, nor come into less than 25 fathoms, until the lighthouse bears S.E. by S. Although not compulsory, vessels with cargo for Valparaiso generally engage the services of a pilot for mooring and unmooring. Vessels wishing to be towed from or to sea will have to arrange terms with the tugs, the charge depending on the distance. From May to August vessels must moor with two anchors forward, each cable to be 105 fathoms in length in water, and one anchor astern with 90 fathoms of cable. From September to May, on account of the strong south winds, 90 fathoms forward and 105 fathoms astern.; large ships to have two stern moorings. There is one buoy for the use of vessels calling for orders, which belongs to the government, and for which no charge is made; there is another buoy for the use of vessels having explosives on board. Supplies of all kinds are plentiful, and generally moderate in price. Masters of vessels are held responsible for the condition of the cargo, until such time as the same shall be entered in the Custom-house books as having been received in good order."
 
Peru and then Wales > >
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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