ATOSSA
 
 
To Chile and back 1864-1865
 
On 22nd July 1864 Philip H Williams signed ‘Atossa’s Agreement and Account of Crew (Foreign-Going Ship) to witness that “. . . the said parties have subscribed their Names hereto on the dates against their respective Signatures mentioned.”
 
NAME &
DATE OF SIGNING ON

AGE &
 PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP &
DATE & PLACE OF DISCHARGE

Philip Henry Williams

25
Swansea

Master

Same Ship

James Rudman
23rd July 1864

 26
Swansea

 Mate

Georgiana Grenfell - Sunderland
May 1864 - Swansea

William Oliver
22nd July 1864

 23
Sunderland

 Carpenter

First Ship

John J Clark
22nd July 1864

 27
Isle of Man

Steward

Jane – Jersey
27th June 1864 - Ostend

David Long
22nd July 1864

 36
Swansea

Cook & AB

Zehlima - Sunderland
26th June 1864 - Liverpool

Peter McDonald
22nd July 1864

 31
Halifax

AB

Cornwall – London
22nd July 1864 - Swansea

Henry Johnson
22nd July 1864

 26
Danzig

AB

Cornwall – London
22nd July 1864 - Swansea

William G[?]  
22nd July 1864

 21
Hamburg

OS

Cornwall – London
22nd July 1864 - Swansea

William H Jones
22nd July 1864

21
Swansea

AB

Illimani - Liverpool
28th June 1864 - Liverpool

John (X) Moore
22nd July 1864

 18
Salcombe

OS

Dartmouth
20th July 1864 - Swansea

Thomas Smith
26th July 1864

22
Hartlepool

AB

Foreign Ship

Thomas (X) Phillips
26th July 1864

23
Carmarthen

AB

Argus - Whitby
8th July 1864 - Swansea

Alberth P[?]  
26th July 1864

19
Norway

OS

Foreign Ship

George Enright
26th July 1864

20
Swansea

OS

Zehlima - Sunderland
26th June 1864

James (X) Long
26th July 1864

18
Swansea

OS

Enfield – Swansea
24th July 1864 - Swansea

Benjamin Bailes

17

Apprentice

-

John G Blacklock

16

Apprentice

-

John Forbes

17

Apprentice

                                             -

 
The crew’s wages were: -
 
RANK
MONTHLY
WAGE
ADVANCE OF
WAGES
MONTHLY
ALLOTMENT

Mate

£6 0s 0d

£6 0s 0d

£3 0s 0d

Carpenter

£5 10s 0d

£5 10s 0d

£2 15s 0d

Steward

£3 5s 0d

£3 5s 0d

-

Cook & AB

£3 7s 6d

£3 7s 6d

-

AB

£2 17s 6d

£2 17s 6d

Nil except for McDonald
who received £1 8s 0d

OS except
Alberth P[?]

£2 10s 0d

£2 10s 0d

-

OS
Alberth P[?]

£2 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

-

 
Each crew member was entitled to provisions on the following scale: -

1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ⅛oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A daily allowance of 2ozs of sugar.
A daily allowance of 3 quarts of water.
Equivalent substitutes at the Master’s option.

The ship was authorised to sail from ‘Swansea to Valparaiso And Any Ports on the West Coast of South America, north of the South Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, Australian Colonies, North or South Atlantic Ocean, United States of America or Continent of Europe and back to a final port of discharge in the United Kingdom. Term of service not to exceed two Years.’
James Rudman was born on 29th July 1837 in Swansea. He first served on ‘Mangosteen’ when he was 17 years old. On 21st May 1864 he was issued with an ‘Only Mate’ certificate, numbered 31285. He gave his address as 8 Wellington Street, Swansea at this time. He joined ‘Atossa’ on 8th June 1865.
‘Atossa’ first appeared in Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign Shipping in 1865. P. Williams was recorded as the Master. The register showed ‘Atossa’ as 483 tons and recorded that she had been built under Special Survey, as per Section 35 of the Society’s (Lloyd’s Classification Society) Rules. This meant that the hull of the ship had been inspected by the Society’s surveyors during construction and that the requirements of the Rules and the approved plans had been carried out satisfactorily.
The highest class assigned to a new wooden ship, or to ships ‘continued’, or ‘restored’ was given the letter A, associated with a term of years, ranging from 8 to 18, which were determined by the characteristics of the timber employed in the construction, the type and quality of the fastenings used and other associated items. When the first term, dating from the month of launching, expired, the Class could be ‘continued’, and subsequently ‘restored’, for various periods on the same character, viz. one-third or two-thirds of the original term on continuation, depending on the particular survey undertaken, and one-half term on restoration. Providing that the vessel met the necessary standards, the number ‘1’ was added after the letter A, indicating that the equipment of anchors, hawsers and cables was in conformity with the Rules of the Society and signifying that the vessel was ‘well and sufficiently found’.
Included in the 1865 register were abbreviations and headings showing: -
1. 'F. & Y. M. 63' - Indicating the type and quality of fastenings used [Felt and Yellow Metal] followed by the year that the work was carried out [1863].
2. 'c.f.' - Indicating the type and quality [Copper or Yellow Metal fastened] of components used in construction.
3. 'Port of Survey - Sunderland'.
4. 'Destined Voyage - South America'.
5. 'Number of years first assigned - 13'
6. 'Character of Hull & Stores - A1 10,63' - The condition of the vessel and the date of survey.
‘Atossa’ arrived at Valparaiso on 7th November 1864 and the Agreement and two Indentures were deposited with the British Consul. The documents were returned to the Master on 12th November 1864.
Lloyd’s List for 14th January 1865 recorded, “Valparaiso, 1st Dec. The ‘Atossa’ (barque), Williams, which arrived here 7th Nov. from Swansea, on arrival at her port of discharge found that her cargo was on fire, but no damage has been sustained by the vessel in consequence thereof.”
‘Atossa’ arrived in Carrizal Bajo, Chile on 19th December 1864.
Carrizal Bajo was described in ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ as being “the only lawful port of entry between Huasco and Caldera. A vessel anchoring in any other place between the two before mentioned, is liable to confiscation. Exports: copper, regulus, copper ore, gold ore, and manganese ore. Imports: coal, bricks, and provisions. Shipmasters bound for Carrizal Bajo should never attempt to run into the cove without the harbour pilot being on board, as the risk of doing damage would be great, and nothing gained even if no damage occurred. When nearing this place, should the pilot not be able to come off in time to pilot her into the cove, then come to an anchor to the N. W. of the island, in from 9 to 10 fathoms water, about two cable-lengths from the said island, and there remain to be received by the maritime authorities and the pilot .”
The ship’s Agreement shows that on 28th November 1864 crew members Thomas Smith and Thomas Phillips deserted ‘Atossa’ in Carrizal Bajo, and that on 12th December 1864, they were followed by John J Clark and William H Jones.
Seamen often ‘deserted’ after arriving at a port or ‘failed to join’ the ship after signing on; both occasions where they had been paid due wages or advanced an allotment. To ‘assist’ them with finding accommodation and entertainment ashore, a crimp would endeavour to make early contact with seamen; often before the ship had docked.
A crimp was someone who encouraged seamen to spend their money and provide credit at particular boarding houses, public houses, music halls or brothels, which the crimp either owned or acted as agent for.  This would often lead to the seaman becoming indebted to the crimp. The crimp would also arrange the ‘sale’ of seamen to ships masters who were enlisting crews. Often the indebted seaman would sign on as directed by the crimp in order to pay off a debt.
On 20th January 1865 the Vice Consul at Carrizal Bajo endorsed the ship’s Agreement to the effect that he had been informed of the desertion of Smith, Phillips, Clark and Jones, and sanctioned the engagement of David Morgan, William Lubbock and Rudolph Wurth and that they had signed the Agreement in his presence.
Morgan, Lubbock and Wurth joined the remaining crew for the voyage to Swansea.
 

NAME

AGE &
PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP & PORT AT
WHICH REGISTERED,
DISCHARGE - DATE & PLACE

David Morgan

27 - Cardigan

AB

Buenaventura - [?] 
28th December 1864 - Yarmouth

William (X) Lubbock

23 – West Lynn

AB

Georgiana (26061) - Liverpool
[?] 1864 - Swansea

Rudolph Wurth

21 - Stettin

OS

Maria Theresa - Hamburg
December 1864 - Valparaiso

 
Morgan was paid at the rate of £4 10s 0d per calendar month with no advance. Lubbock received £4 0s 0d per calendar month with one month’s pay in advance. Wurth was paid £3 10s 0d per calendar month with one month’s money in advance. None of the three men received a monthly allotment payment.
‘Atossa’ was in port in Swansea by 11th May 1865 when all crew members were discharged. The Master, Philip Williams and Mate, James Rudman were discharged the following day.
 
Clements becomes Master - Chilean Ports Blockaded > >
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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