ATOSSA
 
 
Clements becomes Master - Chilean Ports Blockaded
 
 
Philip Williams was replaced by Peter Clements as Master of ‘Atossa’. Aged 34 years and born in Queenstown, Cork, Ireland, he was the holder of a Masters Certificate Renewal numbered 33394. At the time of taking charge of 'Atossa' he was living in Swansea.
An Agreement and Account of Crew dated 5th June 1865 read: “The several persons whose names are hereto subscribed and whose descriptions are contained below, and of whom ___ are engaged as Sailors, hereby agree to serve on board the said Ship, in the several capacities expressed against their respective Names, on a voyage from Swansea to Valparaiso and any ports in Chile, Peru, Bolivia, North and South Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, China Sea, Australian Colonies, North and South Atlantic Ocean, United States of America or Continent of Europe and for a final port of discharge in the United Kingdom. Time of same not to exceed Two Years.”
Crew members were: -
 

NAME

AGE &
PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK
(Certificate Number)

PREVIOUS SHIP & PORT AT
WHICH REGISTERED,
DISCHARGE - DATE & PLACE

Peter Clements

34 - Queenstown

Master
(33394)

Albion – Sunderland
Wrecked

James Rudman

26 - Swansea

Mate
(34119)

Atossa - Sunderland
Continued

Walter B. Ridley

25 - Jamaica

Bosun

[?] - Sunderland
16th May 1865 - Yarmouth

Cornelius (X) John

27 - Swansea

Carpenter

Georgiana Grenfell - Sunderland
4th April 1865 - Swansea

George Latimer

30 - London

Steward

[?] - Liverpool
20th May 1865 - Liverpool

George Prout

49 - Dartmouth

Cook

Hawkeye - Swansea
1st May 1865 - Swansea

Arthur Barlow

23 - Liverpool

AB

Athelstane - Yarmouth
31st May 1865 - Swansea

Frederick Hinckly

20 - Swansea

AB

Lizzie Annie - Sunderland
13th May 1865 - London

Marcus Thompson

22 - Sweden

AB

Egbert - Yarmouth
6th May 1865 - Liverpool

William Hazelut

21 - Swansea

AB

Flora de Maria - Teignmouth
9th May 1865 - Swansea

Henry Hawkay

21 - Bridgwater

AB

Lizzie Annie - Sunderland
13th May 1865 - London

Charles Miller

18 - Swansea

OS

Egbert - Yarmouth
6th May 1865 - Liverpool

James (X) Logan

19 - Liverpool

OS

Caldera - Swansea
10th May 1865 - Swansea

John Kekhafen

28 - Prussia

Sailmaker

Reserve - Liverpool
May 1865 - Plymouth

Benjamin Bailes

18

Apprentice

John Herbert Farr

15

Apprentice

 

John Hopkins

15 - Swansea

Boy

First Ship

 
Walter Brandon Ridley was born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1842. He married Jessy Renoden in Swansea in 1862 and at the time of the 1881 census they were living at 5 Fynone Street, Swansea with their three children; son Wallis aged 14 years, Henry Brandon aged 11 years, and Jessy Emmeline aged 8 years.
Most of the crew signed on during 5th June 1865. Latimer and Hopkins signed on, on the 9th June 1865. Walter B. Ridley, James Logan and John Kekhafen signed on, on the 12th June 1865. Ridley replaced a man named David Downs as Bosun. Born in Swansea, Downs had failed to join the ‘Atossa’, as had William Phillips, a 23 year old Able Seaman, born in Solva, Pembrokeshire. Phillips had previously served on the ‘Mary Lester’ of Helford and he had been discharged from the ship in Swansea on 15th May 1865.
The crew’s wages were: -
 

RANK

MONTHLY
WAGE

ADVANCE OF
WAGES

MONTHLY
ALLOTMENT

Bosun

£4 5s 0d

-

£2 2s 6d

Carpenter

£6 0s 0d

£3 0s 0d  

£3 0s 0d

Steward

£3 7s 6d

£3 7s 6d

£2 0s 0d

Cook

£3 2s 6d

£3 2s 6d

£1 11s 0d

Sailmaker

£3 2s 6d

£3 2s 6d

-

AB: Hinckley, Hazelut, Hawkay

£2 17s 6d

-

£1 8s 0d

AB: Barlow

£2 17s 6d

£2 17s 6d

-

All other AB

£2 17s 6d

-

-

OS: Miller

£2 15s 0d

£2 15s 0d

£1 0s 0d

OS: Logan

£2 5s 0d

£2 5s 0d

-

Boy

10s 0d

10s 0d

-

 
Each crew member was entitled to provisions on the following scale: -

1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ⅛oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A daily allowance of 2ozs of sugar.
A daily allowance of 3 quarts of water.

The Nottinghamshire Guardian newspaper of Friday 24th November 1865 carried news that, “Advices from Valparaiso of the 30th of September state that on the 24th of September the Spanish Admiral declared the whole coast of Chili (sic) under blockade. On that and the next day the following vessels arrived off and were warned away by the blockading frigates, viz. the ‘Atossa’, ‘Athelstane’ and ‘Egbert’ all from Swansea.”
The New York Times newspaper reported on 11th November 1865 that, “War has broken out between Spain and Chili (sic), in consequence of demands made by the former power, to which Chili could not honorably accede. The Admiral in command of the Spanish fleet in South American waters has proclaimed the blockade of the Chilian (sic) ports, giving neutral vessels ten days to clear in. Chili takes up the gauntlet with great spirit. The people subscribe liberally for the support of the government. Letters-of-marque have been issued by the Chilian authorities, and there is every prospect of a very lively time in that part of the world.”
The Agreement showed that ‘Atossa’ arrived in Cobija on the Pacific coast of Chile on 7th October 1865. The Master deposited the Ships Agreement in two folios and two Indentures with the Duty Vice Consul at the British Consulate. The papers were returned to Clements on the 31st October 1865 when the ship left Cobija and headed north along the coast for the port of Iquique, Chile.
The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ manual described Cobija as “in lat 22.39.30 S., long 70.12 W. Distance by sea from Liverpool, 9,420 miles. Cobija has a good anchorage in 8 to 9 fathoms, sand and broken shells, over a rocky bottom. A church on a slope at the back of the town is an excellent mark, as it can be seen on a clear day 20 miles off. Imports – English baizes, English and American cotton shirting, sheeting, drillings, French and German cloths, poncho cloths, Manchester shawls, boots and shoes, cutlery, etc. Exports – Bar-tin, copper, barilla, regulus, and ore.”
The British Vice-Consulate in Iquique made two endorsements to the ships Agreement. Both dated 7th November 1865, the first referring to the Ships Agreement read ‘Duly deposited in this Vice Consulate and returned to the Master this day as the ship clearing out for the Port of Arica calling at the Out Port of Pisagua.’
The second endorsement read “I hereby certify that the within named George Prout, Cook, has been left in the British Hospital at this Port owing to ill health and incapacity to do any work with permission and upon the understanding to rejoin the ship upon his recovery.” Both entries are signed by the Vice Consul.
 
Iquique
 
Iquique is described in ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ as “in lat. 20.12.30 S., long. 70.11.15 W. Distance by sea from Liverpool 9,475 miles. It is a place of considerable trade. The silver mines of Huantajaya are in this vicinity. There is good anchorage at 11 fathoms. Vessels are usually chartered in England, and at Valparaiso.”
Pisagua, Chile is about 30 miles to the north of Iquique.
 
Pisagua   Pisagua
Pisagua
Courtesy of albumdesierto.cl


The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ manual described Pisagua as “in lat. 19.36.30 S., long. 70.17 W. 40 miles north of Iquique. Vessels moor between one-eighth to a quarter of a mile from the shore, in 8 to 15 fathoms of water. Surf very bad during the months of November, December, and January, but very seldom stops work in the bay. Export – Nitrate.”
Lloyd’s List of 15th December 1865 carried a “List of vessels which on arriving off the port of Valparaiso have been notified of the Blockade, between 24th Sept. and 24th Oct., 1865, obtained from Admiral Pareja through the medium of H. B. M. Consul at this port. – ‘Atossa’ (British Barque) From Swansea. Coal.”
Spanish Admiral José Manuel Pareja sailed to Valparaiso on 17th September 1865 to demand an apology from Chile over its decision not to sell supplies to the Spanish fleet. This followed Chile’s support of Peru, which objected to the seizure by Spain of the Chincha Islands, 13 miles off the south-west coast of Peru. Spain, not having recognised Peru’s independence, occupied the islands in April 1864 wishing to benefit from the sale of the extensive guano deposits found there. Admiral Pareja did not receive an apology and he declared war on Chile on 24th September 1865, blockading the country's principle ports. By 17th November 1865 with his blockade faltering, the crews of his ships became demoralised. On 26th November 1865 during the Battle of Papudo, the Spanish schooner ‘Virgen de Covadonga’ was captured by the Chileans. Four Spanish sailors were killed and twenty-one were injured. Admiral Pareja's correspondence was seized. The Admiral was unaware of this until, on 27th November 1865 the American Consul mentioned it, at which Parejo suffered a nervous collapse. The following day, 28th November 1865 the Admiral, dressed in his best uniform, laid on his bed aboard his flagship ‘Villa de Madrid’ moored off Valparaiso, and shot himself in the head.
The London Evening Standard newspaper of Monday 2nd January 1866 recorded that ‘Atossa’ had reached Valparaiso on 7th November 1885 from Swansea carrying coal.
Coal mined in South Wales was considered the worlds’ best steaming coal. It burning brighter and lasted longer, and was the most economic coal for shipping and industry.
An entry in the Agreement showed that ‘Atossa’ “arrived and anchored at the Port of Pena Blanca the 25th day of December 1865. The following day the Agreement was deposited at the Vice Consulate Huasco, the same returned to the Master this date; 24th January 1866. Port of Huasco. A. L. Roberts.”
The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ manual described Pena Blanca as “in lat. 28.42 S., long. 71.22 W. It is a minor port. Export – Ore.”
In the same manual Huasco is described as “in lat. 28.27 S., long. 71.16 W. The anchorage is in 5 fathoms, sandy bottom, about half a mile off the landing place. It is an inconvenient anchorage, exposed to northerly winds, which, however, do not often occur in violence. Vessels are discharged and loaded by lighters. The port of Huasco being merely a port of call and not a free port vessels are not allowed to enter – coming from a foreign port – with the object of discharging cargo on which duties are levied, or loading minerals, without previously being provided with a licence from the Valparaiso Custom-house.”
‘Atossa’ returned to the United Kingdom, arriving at Swansea, Wales on 12th May 1866.
All crew members including George Prout, who had been hospitalised in Iquique and had recovered and rejoined the ship, were discharged in Swansea on that date. The Master endorsed the Agreement “I declare to the truth of the entries in this Agreement and Account of Crew, &c. Delivered to the Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office at Swansea on the 15th day of May 1866.”
Peter Clements ‘continued’ with the ship.
 
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 > >
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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