ATOSSA
 
 
Return to Chile and the loss of an Apprentice
 
During the period between 16th May 1867 and the end of June 1867 ‘Atossa’ sailed from Liverpool to Sunderland.
On 1st July 1867 Peter Clements signed an endorsement acknowledging the details of the forthcoming voyage applied to the Agreement and Account of Crew. The ship was to sail "from the Tyne to Valparaíso, thence as required to any port or ports, place or places on the west coast of So. America, Chinsha Islands, Australia, New Zealand, the Cape of Good Hope, Indian Ocean, China Seas, or in the No. or So. Pacific, No. or So. Atlantic Oceans, United States, West Indies, trading in or between any or all of the above named places, seas or adjacent bays or gulfs, and back to a port of discharge of gear in the United Kingdom or the Continent of Europe including the Mediterranean, the final port Discharge of crew in the United Kingdom calling for orders when & where required. The voyage not to exceed Two Years."
The Agreement continued “And the said crew agree to conduct themselves in an orderly, faithful, honest, and sober manner, and to be at all times diligent in their respective Duties, and, to be obedient to the lawful Commands of the said Master, or of any Person who shall lawfully succeed him, and of their Superior Officers, in everything relating to the said Ship and the Stores and Cargo thereof, whether on board, in boats, or on shore; in consideration of which Services to be duly performed, the said Master hereby agrees to pay to the Crew as Wages the Sums against their Names respectively expressed, and to supply them with Provisions according to the annexed Scale: And it is hereby agreed, That any Embezzlement or wilful or negligent Destruction of any part of the Ship’s Cargo or Stores shall be made good to the Owner out of the Wages of the Person guilty of the same: And if any Person enters himself as qualified for a duty which he proves incompetent to perform, his Wages shall be reduced in proportion to his in competency: And it is also agreed, That the Regulations authorized by the Board of Trade which in the paper annexed hereto are numbered (blank) are adopted by the parties hereto, and shall be considered as embodied in this Agreement: And it is also agreed, That if any Member of the Crew considers himself to be aggrieved by any breach of the Agreement or otherwise, he shall represent the same to the Master or Officer in charge of the Ship in a quiet and orderly manner, who shall thereupon take such steps as the case may require. And it is also agreed, That the crew consists of fourteen persons all told any over to be considered as extra.”
The Agreement showed the ship’s owner as William Nicholson and his address as High Street East, Sunderland. Peter Clements address was given as Hanover Street, Swansea.
The majority of the crew signed on, on 1st July 1867 and joined the ship immediately. John Kekhafen, the Boatswain, signed on, on 2nd July 1867. The Mate, Joseph K. Hudson signed on, on 3rd July 1867. Both men joined ‘Atossa’ at 9am on 4th July 1867.
The full crew list was: -
 

NAME

AGE &
PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK
(Certificate Number)

PREVIOUS SHIP & PORT AT
WHICH REGISTERED,
DISCHARGE - DATE & PLACE

Peter Clements

34
Queenstown

Master
(33394)

Same Ship

Joseph K. Hudson

26
Maryport

Mate
(26252)

Princess Elsida - Whitby
24th April 1867 - Shields

John Kekhafen

29
Wolgast

Boatswain

Atossa - Sunderland
14th May 1867 - Liverpool

Joseph Kitchen

23
Sunderland

Carpenter

Youngsters - Sunderland
2nd May 1867 - Sunderland

James Smiles

21
Sunderland

Boatswain

Corrina - Sunderland
28th May 1867 - Liverpool

Luke Thornton

33
Westmoreland

Steward

Ampthill - Sunderland
21st May 1867 - Sunderland

Edwin Colebrook

23
Sunderland

Cook / AB

Ceylon - Sunderland
16th June 1867 - London

Alexander Cathcart

33
Dundee

AB

European - Sunderland
3rd May 1867 - Glasgow

John (X) Anderson

23
Sweden

AB

Ganges - Liverpool
6th June 1867 - Liverpool

Andrew (X) Muband

23
Norway

AB

Violet - Liverpool
5th June 1867 - Liverpool

Henry Wilson

23
Stockholm

AB

Ganges - Liverpool
6th June 1867 - Liverpool

Christopher Wilson

20
Falkirk

AB

Chevalier - Greenock
6th June 1867 - Liverpool

John (X) Gibb

21
Dundee

AB

Prince Fred. William - Aberdeen
30th May 1867 - Aberdeen

John Patullo

19
Dundee

OS

Comely - Shields
28th June 1867 - Hull

Benjamin Bailes

-

Apprentice

John H Farr

-

Apprentice

William Barber

-

Apprentice

 
Joseph Kendal Hudson was born in 1841, in Maryport, Cumberland. On 20th September 1856, at the age of fifteen he became an Indentured Apprentice for four years to Thomas Walker of Maryport. He served his whole apprenticeship aboard 'Brothers' (official number 12619) of Maryport. As a seaman he served aboard:-
 
NAME & OFFICIAL NUMBER PORT FROM TO
Lady Prudhoe (14075) Sunderland 29th September 1860 20th June 1861
Madeline (28044) Sunderland 12th August 1861 12th May 1862
 
On Saturday 5th July 1862 Dublin's Saunders's News-Letter newspaper reported that Joseph had passed his Only Mate examination in Dublin. His home address shown on the Mate Only certificate, numbered 26252, was King Street, Maryport, Cumberland.
The Carlisle Patriot newspaper of Friday 8th August 1873 carried the paragraph, "Deserting His Ship. Joseph Kendal Hudson was charged with deserting from the ship 'James Davidson', at Workington, on Wednesday last. Defendant had signed articles for a voyage to Trieste and back; and it was arranged that he should go aboard the same night. He neglected to do so; and did not turn up till four o'clock in the morning. When they had got aboard he and another man lost their caps in the water, and they were permitted to take a boat and go in search for them. Instead of returning, however, the men took the opportunity to make away. The ship was short handed, and had to put into Whitehaven, by which some 40l or 50l was lost to the owners. The bench committed Hudson to gaol for ten weeks."
On the day of the 1881 Census, Joseph was with his 25-year-old wife, Emma, who was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne, visiting John and Janet Anderson at their home; 4 Pink Lane, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland. This John Anderson was a Scottish 40-year-old Chemist’s Assistant and not the John Anderson that sailed with Hudson on this voyage. Joseph Hudson gave his occupation as ‘Seaman’.
On Tuesday 12th February 1889 the South Wales Echo newspaper recorded "25 Hours in a Boat. Joseph Kendal Hudson, mate (Maryport), and John Davies, seaman (Swansea), both members of the crew of the 'Memlin', a Glasgow ship, bound from Saffe [Safi], on the African coast, to Casa Blanca, with Indian corn, gave a graphic account of the mishap which occurred to the ship on her voyage home to England. The men are now at the Sailors' Home, Cardiff. They state that they left Saffe a little over three weeks ago, at 7 p.m. The ship contained the captain and 17 of the crew. It had then no merchandise. At five o'clock on the next morning - three weeks to yesterday (Monday) morning - the ship struck and, apparently, went clean down. It was blowing a heavy gale at the time. All the crew escaped into the two lifeboats attached to the ship only just in time to save their lives. "Had we", says Joseph Hudson, "remained half-an-hour longer on the ship, we would have had no chance of escape." They had no provisions of any kind with them, and for 25 hours they were tossing about in "broken water", as Hudson phrases it. The 'Merphia', bound for Marseilles, which had left Saffe in search of them, fearing calamity, then picked them up, all safe and sound. The two men speak in the highest terms of the kind and liberal treatment they and their mates met with at the hands of the captain and crew of the 'Merphia'. All the rescued men were subsequently landed in London, and the two hardy men at the Sailors' Home had their passage defrayed to Cardiff by the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society. They left London only on Friday, and are now awaiting orders. The owners of the ill-fated 'Memlin' are Raeburn & Co., Glasgow."
In May 1890, Joseph Hudson applied for a duplicate Only Mate certificate. He provided an explanation as to the loss of his original certificate which read, "I placed it amongst some Books in the Sailors Home which were given away to another man who had not observed that my Cert. was there. I have not been able to trace the seaman." He was issued with a replacement certificate, numbered 22419, at the cost to him of five shillings. His address at this time was Marble Bar, Clive Street, North Shields. His application included details of some of the ships that he had served on.
 
NAME PORT RANK FROM TO
Elsie Whitby Boatswain & ? Mate 1886 1889
Darial London AB January 1890 2nd February 1890
Zeus London Cook 11th February 1890 27th April 1890
 
James Smiles, in the 1881 Census, showed as First Mate on the ‘S.S. Bradley’.
Alexander Davidson Cathcart was born on 26th August 1833 in Dundee, Scotland and baptised there on 1st September 1833. His parents were James and Barbara (nee Symon) Cathcart.
John Smith Patullo was born on 21st January 1848 and baptised on 6th February 1848 in Dundee, Scotland. His parents were James and Helen (nee Black) Patullo.
On 24th September 1874 he married Catherine Ann Kent in Liverpool. They were both living at 10 Raffles Street, Liverpool at the time. Catherine was born in Liverpool.
The 1881 census showed the couple living at 4 Back South, Chester Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire, with their two children, Sarah Ann Patullo, aged 6 years, who was born in Liverpool, and 4-year-old John Sabeston Patullo who was born in Hull, Yorkshire. John Smith Patullo, aged 33 years, gave his occupation as Seaman.
In the 1891 census John and Catherine were resident at 119 Rathbone Street, Liverpool with Sarah Ann and John, and four other children; Charles Edward (9 years, born in Liverpool), James Sebastian (6 years, born in Scotland), Catherine Elizabeth (2 years, born in Liverpool), and Thomas Kent (1 year, born in Liverpool on 24th October 1889).
In 1891 another son, George, was born. He died at the age of four years.
Ten years later, the 1901 census finds the couple living at 16 Mulberry Street, Liverpool with a son, Francis (19 years, a General Labourer), James Sebastian (born in Dundee; a Shoemaker), Catherine Elizabeth and Thomas Kent.
In 1911, the census shows John, now 63 years old, and Catherine (56 years), living at 18 Easby Road, Liverpool, with their son James, whose occupation is given as a Railway Porter on the London & North Western Railway. John’s occupation was shown as an Able Seaman Mariner with the Cunard Line.
John was a Cunard employee between, at least, 1897 and 1913, serving initially as AB on ‘Lucania’, ‘Campania’, and latterly as Master-at-Arms on ‘Franconia’.
In 1923 John Smith Patullo was still living at 18 Easby Road, Liverpool when died. He was buried on 6th December 1923 in Grave 1271 at Ford Cemetery, Liverpool.
 
John Smith Patullo
John Smith Patullo
Master-at-Arms
ancestry.co.uk
 
The crew’s wages on 'Atossa's 1867 voyage were: -
 

RANK & (NAME)

MONTHLY
WAGE

ADVANCE OF
WAGES

MONTHLY
ALLOTMENT

Mate (Hudson)

£5 10s 0d

£2 15s 0d

£2 15s 0d

Boatswain  (Kekhafen)

£4 5s 0d

£4 5s 0d

-

Boatswain (Smiles)

£3 2s 6d

£3 2s 6d

£1 10s 0d

Cook / AB (Colebrook)

£3 5s 0d

-

£1 12s 6d

Carpenter (Kitchen)

£5 0s 0d

£5 0s 0d

£2 10s 0d

Steward (Thornton)

£3 10s 0d

£3 10s 0d

£1 15s 0d

Able Seaman (All Six)

£3 0s 0d

£3 0s 0d

-

Ordinary Seaman (Patullo)

£2 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

-

 
The ration allowance for every man was: -
1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
⅓lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ⅛oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A daily allowance of 2ozs of sugar.
A daily allowance of 3 quarts of water.
Equivalent substitutes may be issued at the Master’s option.
No spirits allowed.
1oz of Coffee, or Cocoa, or Chocolate, may be substituted for ¼oz of Tea.
Molasses for Sugar, the quantity to be one half more.
1lb of Potatoes or Yams, ½lb of Flour or Rice, ⅓ of a pint of Peas, or ¼ of a pint of Barley,
may be substitutes for each other.
When fresh meat is issued, the proportion to be 2lbs per man per day, in lieu of Salt Meat, Flour, Rice, and Peas.
Beef and Pork may be substituted each for the other.
Tea, Coffee, and Sugar may be issued weekly, fortnightly, or monthly, at the option of the Master.
 
‘Atossa’ sailed from Sunderland on 5th July 1867.
Lloyd’s List noted that ‘Atossa’ was “off the Wight” bound for Valparaiso on 9th July 1867.
The Newcastle Daily Journal newspaper reported that ‘Atossa’ had been “in lat. 43° 15’ N long 10° 28’ W.” on 17th July 1867.
The Official Log Book entries read: -
“Saturday August 17th /67 – 2° S Lat 25° W Long – At 5H pm found Luke Thornton in a very drunken state he laying on the half sheets & neglecting his duty – Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain – The above entry has been read over to the said Luke Thornton Steward. his reply nothing to say. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain"
"Sunday August 18th /67 – 4° S Lat 27° W Long – At 8H 0’ am found Luke Thornton intoxicated & utterly incapable of attending to breakfast. I had to put him to bed. At about 4pm on my asking him where he got the drink he confessed to have taken it out of one of the cabin lockers & on my remonstrating with him he promised not to do so again & I took him into the cabin. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain. The above entry has been read over to the said Luke Thornton. his reply nothing to say. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain”
The Agreement and Account of Crew and two Indentures were deposited with the British Consulate in Valparaíso, Chile on 13th October 1867. Archibald Elley, on behalf of the Consulate endorsed the Agreement accordingly and further added that the same documents were returned to Peter Clements two days later, on 15th October 1867.
On 20th October 1867 ‘Atossa’ was in Coquimbo, Chile. Alex Gollan, the British Consul endorsed the Agreement. He noted that the ship had arrived on 20th October and that ‘articles deposited’ were in his possession. He further noted on 7th November 1867 that the papers were returned to the Master.
During the 1840`s mining activity made Coquimbo, on Chile’s Pacific coast, the export centre of the Region’s booming gold and copper industries.
The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ manual described Coquimbo as “lat 29.56 S., long 71.20 W. Distance from Liverpool by sea 8,965 m. The anchorage is well sheltered from the northerly winds, and of an average depth of 8 fathoms. Ships are discharged by lighters. There are 3 fathoms close in shore. Exports – Copper, manganese, hides. Imports – Coal, coke, firebricks, iron, and Manchester goods.”
Atossa’s Log Book continued: -
“Thursday October 31st /67 – Coquimbo – Luke Thornton Steward (by some means unknown to me) got drunk, every thing in the liquor line being locked up. This being the third offence since my arrival in this Port I now demote him & put him to work as best he can before the mast. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph R. Hudson Mate – John Kekhaven Boatswain – The above entry has been read over to the said Luke Thornton. his reply Nothing to say. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain"
"Friday November 1st /67 – Coquimbo – Luke Thornton refused to do work of any kind before the mast & told me he would suffer death first. He then went forward & remained off duty all day. Another employed to take his place as Steward. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph R. Hudson Mate – John Kekhaven Boatswain. – The above entry has been read over to the said Luke Thornton. His reply. Nothing to say. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain"
"Saturday Nov. 2nd /67 - Coquimbo – Luke Thornton at work about the decks & as required. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph R. Hudson Mate – John Kekhaven Boatswain - The above entry has been read over to the said Luke Thornton. his reply. Nothing to say. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – John Kekhafen Boatswain"
"October 21st ’67 to Nov. 13th ’67 - Coquimbo – During the ships stay in this port Doctor Taih has been tending the ships crew more especially John Anderson & Alexander Cathcart who were ill but not off duty. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – James Smiles Boatswain”
Lloyd’s List recorded that ‘Atossa’ arrived in port at Chanaral on 13th November 1867 and the Manchester Courier, and Lancashire General Advertiser reported on that ‘Atossa’s captain had seen a vessel on fire off Cape Horn but that no particulars were given. There had been five or six ships in sight at the time.
Chanaral is approximately nineteen miles to the south of Pan de Azucar, the final port of call before sailing for the United Kingdom. It is described in the ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping in Foreign Ports’ manual as “lat. 26.21 S., 70.42 W. It is not a port of entry, and vessels, to discharge foreign goods, must call at Caldera for Customs clearance, but can obtain clearance of departure for any port. Exports – Copper and copper material.” Pan de Azucar was a small port where copper was worked and exported by ship.
The Log Book continued: -
“Monday Nov. 18th /67 – Chanaral – Luke Thornton resumed his duty as Steward. The above entries has been read over to the said seaman. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – (Blank) Boatswain”
Inbound entries in ‘Atossa’s Log Book read: -
“Monday Feby 17th 1868 – Long 20° 51’ W Lat 1° 24’ N – John Anderson AB off duty complains of pains in his limbs. I consider it rheumatism. Gave a lotion to rub in his legs & medicine as I thought best. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – (Blank) Steward."
"Saturday March 7th /68 – Lat 33° 23’ N Long 34° 35’ W – The above named John Anderson continuing unwell & having severe pains all over his body. Brought him aft to the cabin to live so as he could be better looked after, he being very weak. He getting such nourishment as I have onboard. [?] gruel etc etc & medicine as I thought fit. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – (Blank) Steward”
“Monday 16th March ’68 – Lat 46° 29’ N Long 17° 32’ W – Andrew Muband Laid up with a severe cough he being subject to it at intervals of a week or 10 days all the voyage home. Gave him such medicine as I thought Best, a gargle for his throat - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – James Smiles Boatswain.
"Monday March 16th /68 – The above named John Anderson Still unwell and in a very low state. I fear he has symptoms of scurvy. Treating him as I think best. - Peter Clements Master – Joseph K. Hudson Mate – James Smiles Boatswain"
Scurvy is a disease that results from an insufficient intake of vitamin C (ascorbic acid). Symptoms include black-and-blue spot marks on the skin mostly on the thighs and legs, spongy gums and loss of teeth together with bleeding from all mucous membranes. A person with the ailment looks pale, feels depressed, and suffers with painful joints and general weakness.
The Log Book entries continued: -
“Tuesday March 17th /68 – Lat 47° 55’ N Long 14° 17’ W – At about 5H 30pm William Barber Apprentice fell overboard from the starboard gangway. The helm was instantly put down. Life buoy and sundry pieces of wood thrown overboard. Ships way stopped and her head got round to West. In the mean time the gig was put in the water with four hands and a man sent aloft on fore & main top gallant yard to look out but could see nothing of the Boy. In a short time say 5 minutes from the first alarm the ships head was round West and the boat out and away. In a few minutes more we in the ship keped close along side the Life Buoy & a piece or two wood. Kept the ship under easy sail in the vicinity of the Life Buoy the boat also swung round & the look out aloft but saw nothing. Kept the ship in the vicinity of the Life Buoy until 6H 45pm the boat also looking all round when after a fruitless search the returned to the ship giving up all hopes of saving life. The following officers and men went in the boat. John Kekhafen - Boatswain Acting Second Mate – James Smiles B/swain – Christopher Wilson AB and Henry Wilson AB."
"Tuesday March 17th /68 – continued: - At the time of the aforementioned William Barber falling overboard the ship was Braced Sharp up on the port tack heading East, Wind N.N.E. about a 5 knot breeze with a long N.W. swell. The ship being put round so as to return to the place of the accident which was accomplished in a most incredible short time as coming up to the Life Buoy proved from the circumstances of the deceased not being seen after he passed the Mizen Chains. Tis our opinion he must have sunk immediately he having warm clothing & sea Boots on. Seeing no more could be done kept the ship her course. The fore going pages viz 18, 19 and 20 has been read over to the whole crew - Peter Clements - Joseph K. Hudson Mate –  (Blank) Boatswain Acting 2nd Mate – James Smiles Boatswain – Joseph Kitchen Carpenter – Christopher Wilson AB – Alexander Cathcart AB – Luke E Thornton Steward – Edwin Colebrook Cook”
Latitude 47° 55’ North, Longitude 14° 17’ West is a position in the North Atlantic Ocean approximately 250 miles south-west of the south-west coast of Ireland.
 
Barber-Lost-Apprentice
Latitude 47°55’ W; Longitude 14 °17’ N
Courtesy of findlatitudeandlongitude.com
 
‘Atossa’ arrived in Liverpool on 23rd March 1868. The Official Log Book relating to this voyage was submitted to J. Kendall, the Deputy Shipping Master in Liverpool on 24th March 1868. This complied with the printed note on the Log which stated that ‘the Log Book is to be delivered to the Shipping Master within forty-eight hours after the Ship’s arrival, or upon the discharge of the Crew, whichever first happens, in the case of a ‘Foreign-going Ship’. In the case of a ‘Home Trade Ship’ the Log Book would have had to have been submitted ‘within twenty-one days after the 30th of June and the 31st of December respectively in every year’.
A hand written note attached to the Log Book read, “Liverpool 25 March 1868 – To the Superintendent of M. Marine Office – Sir, My attention having been called to the Index of my Official Log Book not being filled in & to there being no entry of the wages & effects of William Barber Apprentice deceased. I beg to say these were oversights on my part which I will take care it does not recur again. I am Sir – Yours respectfully Peter Clements Master Bk ‘Atossa’
This oversight would have become apparent when Peter Clements completed a form attached to the Official Log Book, headed ‘Wages and effects of Seamen deceased during the voyage’. Under the heading ‘Particulars of Effects (if any) delivered to Superintendent’ it showed that William Barber, Apprentice, possessed One Chest and One Bag. The form confirmed that Barber had no wages due to him.
Another entry in the Log Book read “From enquiries I have made of the crew of the ‘Atossa’ regarding the death of William Barber it appears that he accidentally fell from the starboard gangway whilst drawing a bucket of water and was drowned. Every exertion was made to save him but with no avail. J. Kendall L’pool M. M. Office 25/2/68”
Peter Clements completed the ‘List of Crew and Report of Character’ pages of the Log Book, giving each crew member except Luke Thornton, a ‘V. G.’ reference for both ‘General Conduct’ and ‘Ability in Seamanship’. Thornton received a lower ‘G.’ reference in both categories.
Instructions regarding the categories available to Clements read: - ‘‘V. G.’ for ‘Very Good’; ‘G.’ for ‘Good’; ‘M’ for ‘Middling’; and ‘I’ for ‘Indifferent’. The Master may also have insert particulars of ability or conduct, thus ‘Helm’ good or ‘Sobriety’ indifferent. If he declines giving any opinion he must state opposite the man’s name.”
The ‘Release At The Termination Of A Voyage’ certificate was signed on 25th March 1868 by all crew members except Joseph K. Hudson and John Anderson. Hudson remained with ‘Atossa’ until 17th April 1868 and Anderson had been discharged three days earlier on 14th April 1868.
The account that Peter Clements had given in Valparaiso regarding the fire seen off Cape Horn on ‘Atossa’s journey to Chile appeared in The Dundee Courier and Argus of Wednesday 11th March 1868. The newspaper reported that “The ‘Canaradzo’, Robertson, of Sunderland, left the Wear on her first voyage on the 18th of June last (coal), for Valparaiso, with a crew of 16 hands, all told. She passed Deal on the 21st of June, and has never since been heard of. The only clue that can be got as to her fate is a report by Captain Clement, of the ‘Atossa’ who, on his arrival in Valparaiso, states that in the month of September last, when rounding Cape Horn, the chief mate informed him that a steamer must be approaching them. Captain Clement, on looking through his glass, discovered a vessel in the midst of dense smoke, and with her colours hoisted as if in distress. The wind being light, the ‘Atossa’ could not get alongside the burning vessel. She remained as near to the place as possible for a couple of days, but nothing more was seen of the vessel, and no boats came in sight. There were five or six ships at no great distance from each other about the same time, and if the crew of the burning vessel had taken to their boats, they would in all probability have been picked up, but it would appear that no human being had been saved from the ship.”
 
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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