ATOSSA
 
 
Twenty-One Months Away
 
The crew list for the next voyage, from London to St. Vincent was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR &
PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Edward Whaley

50 – At Sea

Cook/Steward

Camilla, London

William Yewell

28 - Ilfracombe

AB

Camilla, London

James Palmer

28 - Kirkcaldy

AB

Camilla, London

Thomas (X) Collins

40 - Waterford

AB

Mangalore

Amos King

23 - Chichester

OS

Robert and Mary

Alfred Walls

21 – Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

Frederick Robinson

20 - Southwick

OS

Atossa

Frederick Conway

18 - Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

Edward Shepherd

Born 1866 - Littlehampton

Apprentice

-

 
James Palmer was baptised in Kirkcaldy, Fife on the 25th September 1858. His parents were James Palmer and Jane nee Saunderson.
Amos King was baptised on the 31st May 1863 at East Lavant, Sussex. His parents were John and Elizabeth King. At the time of the 1881 Census, Amos was living with his sister, Elizabeth and her husband, William, in Marsh Farm Cottages, Binsted, Sussex.
H. Scrivener had signed on, on the 26th October 1886 in London, in the rank of ‘AB’ but ‘did not join’ the ship. He was aged 35 years, born in London and his previous ship had been the ‘Helvetia’ in Liverpool.
Those who did join the ship all signed on, apart from Whaley and Collins, on the 26th October 1886 and were required to be on board ‘at once’, with the exception of James Palmer who was given until 6am the following day, to present himself. The same had applied to Scrivener, who did not return. Edward Whaley the Cook/Steward signed on, on the 27th October 1886 and was required to be on board at 7am on the 28th October 1886. Thomas Collins signed on by making his mark, on the 29th October 1886 at Gravesend and joined the ship ‘at once’.
Frederick Charles Robinson was baptised at Southwick on the 22nd April 1866. His parents were Luke and Elizabeth Robinson.
Edward Shepherd was an Indentured Apprentice. His Registry of Indenture was dated the 25th May 1886 at Littlehampton. He was the second child of Stephen and Harriett Shepherd and had been baptised at St. Mary’s Church, Littlehampton on the 27th May 1866. In the 1881 Census, 14-year-old Edward was shown living at the Odd Fellows Arms public house in East Street, Littlehampton, where his father was the Innkeeper.
The Agreement enabled ‘Atossa’ to travel between ‘London and Simons Bay and any port or places within the limits of 75 degrees North and 60 degrees South Latitude, the Maximum time three years trading in any rotation and to end in the United Kingdom’.
Although there were only twelve men in total on board, the Agreement showed that on this occasion the ‘number of seamen for whom accommodation is certified – 14’. It also recorded that ‘The crew shall be deemed complete with nine hands all told, of whom three are sailors.’ Of the twelve men, the ‘nine hands’ did not include the Master, the Mate and the Apprentice. The three sailors were those ranked ‘AB’, leaving the Bosun, Cook/Steward and four Ordinary Seamen to make up the number.
The Agreement also stated that ‘Should any member of the crew fail to join at the time specified, the Master may ship a substitute at once. No cash shall be advanced or liberty granted other than at the pleasure of the Master’.
Rates of pay were: -
 

RANK

WAGES PER CALENDAR MONTH

ADVANCE
OF WAGES

MONTHLY
ALLOTMENT

Mate

£6 0s 0d

-

£3 0s 0d

Bosun

£3 12s 6d

-

£1 16s 3d

Cook & Steward

£4.0s.0d

£4 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

AB : Yewell, Palmer

 £2 12s 6d

£2 12s 6d

-

AB : Collins

£2 15s 0d  

£2 15s 0d  

-

OS : King

£2 0s 0d

-

-

OS : Walls

£2 0s 0d

-

£1 0s 0d

OS : Robinson, Conway

£1 0s 0d

-

-

 
Each man was entitled to the following rations: -
 
1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
⅓lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ⅛oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A weekly allowance of 12ozs of sugar.
A daily allowance of 3 quarts of water.
 
With regard to the stowage of the cargo, the ‘Distance in feet and inches between centre of the Disc showing Maximum load line in salt water and upper edge of lines indicating the position of the ship’s deck above that centre’ was shown as ‘3ft 9ins’.
All details shown in this document, with the exception of rates of pay for various crew members, remained valid until the 22nd July 1888 when the Agreement terminated in Newport, Monmouthshire, Wales.
On 31st October 1886 the Evening Standard newspaper reported that ‘Atossa’ had sailed from Gravesend.
‘Atossa’ arrived at St. Vincent on the 2nd December 1886 and remained there until 7th December 1886 during which time the Evening Standard reported that the vessel had reached St. Vincent with her pump gear out of action; that she was repairing and expected to sail within a few days.
By the 8th February 1887 ‘Atossa’ had crossed the Atlantic Ocean to Simonstown on False Bay, 25 miles south of Cape Town. The crew on this journey had remained the same as from London to St. Vincent.
Simonstown is described in the ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping at Foreign Ports’ as “situated on Simon’s Bay, an inlet on the west side of False Bay, in lat 34.11.29 S., long 18.23.48 E. The usual anchorage for vessels is in 7 to 10 fathoms, a quarter of a mile offshore. The bay is considered safe and easy of access all the year round.”
In Simonstown, an official at the Shipping Office recorded in the Agreement, “I certify that the withinamed Wm. Yewell (AB) and Jas. Palmer (AB) has been discharged and left behind at this port on the grounds of mutual consent and that I have accordingly granted my sanction to their being so left and that balance of wages due to them up to the day of discharge have been duly paid to them in cash and that their effects delivered to them.
Further that Frederick Robinson (OS) has been left behind at this port on the alleged grounds of his having deserted and that I have inquired into the matter and find the allegation true and that an entry of such desertion in the official Log Book has been produced to me.
Also that I have sanctioned the engagement of Jules Chevrolet (AB) and Henry Hartly (OS) and James McNelly (AB) upon the terms mentioned in the within written agreement And am satisfied that they fully understand the said Agreement And that they have signed the same in my presence. Given under my hand at Simonstown this the 8th day February 1887.”
The sums owed to William Yewell (AB) and James Palmer (AB) were £5 4s 1d and £4 5s 6d respectively.
The next leg of the journey was to Mauritius, which lies about 500 miles east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean.
The crew list was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Edward Whaley

50 – At Sea

Cook/Steward

Camilla, London

Jules Chevrolet

21 – Le Harve

AB

Beatrice

James McNelly

38 - Dublin

AB

Ardenclutha

Thomas (X) Collins

40 - Waterford

AB

Mangalore

Amos King

23 - Chichester

OS

Robert and Mary

Alfred Walls

21 – Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

Henry Hartly

30 - Manchester

OS

‘Shore Service’

Frederick Conway

18 - Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

Edward Shepherd

Born 1866 - Littlehampton

Apprentice

-

 
Both Chevrolet and Hartly signed on, on the 7th February 1887. McNelly signed on the following day. All three joined the ship, at the time of signing.
Chevrolet and McNelly were paid at the rate of £2 12s 6d per calendar month. McNelly was permitted an advance before sailing of £2 0s 0d. Hartly received a rate of pay of £1 0s 0d per calendar month.
By the 25th March 1887 the ‘Atossa’ was in Port Louis, Mauritius.
On the 15th April 1887, W. Cotton, Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office in Port Louis, endorsed the Agreement. He wrote, “I certify that Henry Hartly has been discharged and left behind at this port on the grounds of mutual consent, that his balance of wages has been paid to him in my presence and his effects also delivered and that I have granted my sanction to his being left behind. That I have sanction the engagement of Geo. Watkins on the terms of the within written agreement. That I have ascertained and am satisfied that he fully understands the said agreement and has signed the same in my presence.”
Henry Hartly was paid £10 0s 0d when he was discharged in Port Louis, Mauritius on the 25th March 1887.
George P. Watkins, who signed on, on the 14th April 1887, replaced Hartly on the next leg of the journey. He joined ‘Atossa’ the same day.
The crew list for the voyage to Karachi was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Edward Whaley

50 – At Sea

Cook/Steward

Camilla, London

Jules Chevrolet

21 – Le Harve

AB

Beatrice

James McNelly

38 - Dublin

AB

Ardenclutha

Thomas (X) Collins

40 - Waterford

AB

Mangalore

Amos King

23 - Chichester

OS

Robert and Mary

Alfred Walls

21 – Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

George P. Watkins

19 - London

OS

Sarah Smith

Frederick Conway

18 - Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

Edward Shepherd

Born 1866 - Littlehampton

Apprentice

-

 
‘Atossa’ had arrived in Karachi by the 16th May 1887.
Karachi is described in the ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping at Foreign Ports’ as “increasing daily in importance as the seaport of Sindh and the Punjab. Distance from Liverpool by the Cape, 10,580 miles. Exports – Saltpetre, salt, rice and other grains, ghee, hides, tallow, oil, oil seeds, salt fish, bark for tanning, raw silk, wool, madder, alkalies, indigo, cotton; also horses and camels from Cabul and the adjoining countries. Imports – Metals, hardware, spices, wines, cottons and silks, twist and yarn, railway plant, European goods.”
While the ship was sailing from Mauritius to Karachi, Edward Shepherd, the Apprentice, fell ill and subsequently died in Karachi on Thursday 19th May 1887. The cause of death was dysentery; an infectious type of gastroenteritis which may be accompanied by other symptoms including fever and abdominal pain.
Edward Shepherd’s death was recorded in the Agreement by the Deputy Shipping Master at Karachi on the 27th May 1887, who ‘Certified that the Master of the ship ‘Atossa’ reported the death at the port of Edward Shepherd at this shipping office. Certified further that the Master was permitted to retain the effects, wages and Indenture on board for delivery at a port in the United Kingdom.’
‘Atossa’ left Karachi with the same crew on the 30th May 1887. Against Edward Shepherd’s name the Agreement showed under the headings ‘Account of Apprentices on board’ and ‘Reason for leaving ship’ – ‘Died of Dysentery’.
Edward Shepherd’s death was also recorded in the “Monthly Lists of Deaths of Seamen – Lists of the Names and other Particulars of Seamen whose Deaths have been reported to the Registrar-General of Seamen during the Month of January 1888”.
The ship had arrived at False Point, India by the 25th June 1887. False Point is a low headland in the Bay of Bengal. The point derives its name from the fact that seamen frequently mistook it for Point Palmyras, which is less than a degree further north.
'Atossa' sailed again, bound for Port Louis, Mauritius, with the same crew on the 22nd July 1887 and had arrived there by the 19th September 1887.
On the 20th October 1887, the Deputy Superintendent Marine named Decolley, of the Mercantile Marine Office, Port Louis, recorded in the Agreement, “This is to certify that the named Amos King, Tho. Collins, Jules Chevrolet and Jas. McNelly have been discharged under the grounds of mutual consent their balance of wages and effects have been delivered to them in my presence. Further that I have sanctioned the engagement of the undermentioned seamen J. William Mortimer, John Le Lievre, Henry Rees, Henry Wiseman, Gustav Kennie and Chas. Anderson and upon the terms mentioned in the articles of agreement and that I am satisfied that they fully understand the said article and signed in my presence.
Further that I have sanctioned the discharge of Henry Rees on account of being sick with ‘Diarrhoea’ and that every thing belonging to him has been delivered to me.”
When Amos King was discharged from the ship on the 21st September 1887 he was paid the sum of £17 8s 5¼d. Thomas Collins was discharged that same day and received £22 9s.5d. Jules Chevrolet was due £14 4s 4½d, and James McNelly received £13 5s 9d. Chevrolet and McNelly were also discharged on the 21st September 1887.
The crew list for the voyage from Port Louis, Mauritius to the Galle, Ceylon read: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Edward Whaley

50 – At Sea

Cook/Steward

Camilla, London

John Le Lievre

29 - Guernsey

AB

Glenorchy

Henry (X) Wiseman

21 - St. Vincent

AB

Jay

Gustav Kennie

28 - Finland

AB

Aladdin

Charles Anderson

28 – [?]

AB

Glenorchy

Alfred Walls

21 – Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

George P. Watkins

19 - London

OS

Sarah Smith

Frederick Conway

18 - Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

William Mortimer

19 - Dundee

OS

Hartfield

 
John Le Lievre (AB), Henry Wiseman (AB), and Gustav Kennie (AB) all signed on, on the 15th October 1887 and joined the ship on the 17th October 1887. Charles Anderson (AB) signed on, on the 20th October 1887 and joined the ship at the time of signing.
All four men were paid at the rate of £3 0s 0d per calendar month and were permitted one months money in advance of sailing.
At the age of 13 years, Henry Wiseman had, on 27th July 1877 become an Indentured Apprentice to J. W. Upham of Brixham, Devon, for a term of eight years. He served on the foreign-going vessel ‘Queen of Clippers’ of Dartmouth; official number 45188; commercial code V.C.H.M. He deserted the ship in February 1883 in Baltimore, USA.
Henry Rees (AB), 48 years old, from Swansea, Wales signed on, on the 15th October 1887 but did not sail with the ship because he was ‘Sick in Hospital’ with diarrhoea. His previous ship had been the ‘Indian Empire’.
William Mortimer (OS) signed on, on the 15th October 1887 and joined the ship on the 17th October 1887.
‘Atossa’ sailed for Point de Galle on the 20th October 1887 or shortly afterwards and departed Point de Galle on the 13th December 1887. The crew list remained the same.
Before the 8th January 1888 the ship had berthed in Colombo. On that day William Mortimer was recorded in the Agreement as being a deserter in Colombo. On the 11th January 1888 the Registrar in the Principle Collectors Office, Customs, Colombo certified that ‘William Mortimer has been reported a deserter and the Master has produced a certificate from the Police that he is not to be found. Jas. Simmons has been duly shipped.’
James Simmons signed on, on the 11th January 1888 in Colombo. He joined the ship on the 20th January 1888. His rate of pay was to be £3 0s 0d per calendar month and he was advanced one months pay before sailing.
‘Atossa’ next sailed, on or soon after the 11th January 1888, was to New York in the United States of America.
The crew list was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Edward Whaley

50 – At Sea

Cook/Steward

Camilla, London

John Le Lievre

29 - Guernsey

AB

Glenorchy

Henry Wiseman

21 - St. Vincent

AB

Jay

Gustav Kennie

28 - Finland

AB

Aladdin

Charles Anderson

28 - [?]

AB

Glenorchy

James Simmons

37 - Truro

AB

Unknown No Discharge

Alfred Walls

21 – Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

George P. Watkins

19 - London

OS

Sarah Smith

Frederick Conway

18 - Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

 
On the 1st February 1888, Patrick Ryan, aged 24 years, from Dublin, Ireland joined the ship ‘At Sea’ in the rank of Ordinary Seaman. His previous ship was unknown and it was recorded in the Agreement that he had ‘no discharge’ papers. He was to be paid at the rate of five shillings per calendar month during the passage to New York.
On 19th April 1888 the Morning Post newspaper reported ‘Atossa’ passing St Helena bound for New York.
On Friday 11th May 1888, the ships papers record her arriving in New York, and the Agreement being deposited with the British Consulate General.
 
 
Atossa Crew New York 1888
Crew of ‘Atossa’ – Atlantic Basin, Brooklyn, New York - May 1888
Family photographs
 
‘Atossa’ remained in New York until the 2nd June 1888, when Horace D. Nugent, the Vice Consul, returned the Agreement to Joseph E. Robinson.
On the same day, G. Fraser, 1st Vice Consul of the British Consulate General in New York, endorsed the Agreement with, “I hereby certify that I have sanctioned the engagement of Henry Johnson, John Greene, H. Hill, B. Sherrie, P. Martinssen, and J. Smith upon the terms mentioned in the within agreement, that I have ascertained and am satisfied that they fully understand the said agreement and that they have signed the same in my presence.
I also certify that Edwd. Whaley, John Le Lievre, Gust. Kennie, Chas. Anderson and Jas. Simmons have been discharged and left behind at this port by the mutual consent of the Master and themselves and with my sanction and that the balances of wages due them have been paid to them in my presence.
I further certify that Frederick Conway and Patrick Ryan have been left behind in this port upon the alleged ground of their having deserted, that I have enquired into the matter and find that the allegation is true and that a proper entry of such desertion in the Log Book has been produced to me.”
Henry Johnson, John Greene, H. Hill, B. Sherrie, P. Martinssen and J. Smith all signed on in New York, on the 24th May 1888, although only Henry Johnson and John Greene actually joined the ship and sailed with her.
Hill was 48 years old, born in Liverpool and his previous ship had been named ‘Hattie H’.
Sherrie, from Belfast, Northern Ireland, was 29 years old and had previously served on an American ship named ‘Windsor' P. Martinssen was 24 years old and from Norway. J. Smith from Hamburg was 39 years old. Both had previously worked on the same American ship named ‘Halifax’.
Henry Johnson and John Greene were both to be paid at the rate of £2.5s.0d per calendar month and received £3.0s.0d in advance before sailing.
Three other men, not mentioned in the Vice Consul’s endorsement, also signed on, on the 24th May 1888. There were John Elleson, Michael Rogers and Karl Fischer. All three were to receive the same pay rate and advance as Johnson and Greene.
The crew list for the next passage from New York to Dunkirk was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

James Grevett

26 - Sussex

Mate

Same Ship

George Mason

24 - Sussex

Bosun

Same Ship

Henry Wiseman

21 - St. Vincent

AB

Jay

Henry Johnson

24 - London

AB

American Vessel

John Greene

20 - Philadelphia

AB

American Vessel

John Elleson

25 - Tyne

AB

American Vessel

Michael Rogers

39 - Philadelphia

AB

American Vessel

Karl Fischer

29 - Germany

AB

American Vessel

Alfred Walls

21 - Wick, Littlehampton

OS

Atossa

George P. Watkins

19 - London

OS

Sarah Smith

 
‘Atossa’ arrived in Dunkirk, France, on the 3rd July 1888 and the Agreement was deposited with the British Consul.
Dunkirk is described in the ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping at Foreign Ports’ manual as “the most northerly seaport in France, 39 miles E.S.E. ½E from Dover, lat. 51.2.9. N., long. 2.22.37 E. The roadstead is defended by the violence of the sea by sandbanks.”
On the 4th July 1888 George Mason, Alfred Walls and Henry Wiseman were all discharged from the ship’s Agreement. Mason was paid the £11 16s 5d that he was due. Walls received £7 6s ½d and Wiseman collected his due wages of £15 13s 3d.
On the 13th July 1888, James Grevett, George P. Watkins and Henry Johnson were similarly discharged. Grevett received £18 8s 11d; Watkins was paid £14 5s 4½d and Johnson collected £1 18s 8d.
On the same day, Michael Rogers and Karl Fischer deserted the ship.
Also on the 13th July 1888, Simpson, the British Consul in Dunkirk, wrote in the Agreement, “H. Wiseman, H. Johnson have been discharged before me on the grounds of mutual consent and that the balances of wages due to them have been paid in my presence. I hereby certify that I have sanctioned the engagement of J. Robertson, A. Delepirre, [?], A. Cleuter, T. Aliveira, T. Palmer, Luna and T. Lewis on the terms mentioned in the within written agreement that they fully understand the same and have signed accordingly in my presence. I hereby certify that the Master has reported to me the desertion K. Fischer and M. Rogers taking their effects and that a proper entry of such desertion in the official Log Book has been produced to me. Ship arrived July 3rd, Agreement deposited July 3rd, Agreement returned 13th July 1888. I hereby certify that J. Grevett, G. Mason, A. Walls, G. Watkins, Robertson, Delepirre, [?] Cleuter, Aliveira, Palmer, Luna and Lewis all signed on in Dunkirk on the 13th July 1888 and accepted the additional handwritten endorsement on the Agreement.”
The endorsement read, “On a run from Dunkirk to Newport the crew to take the ship from where she now lies, make her ready for sea. On arrival at port of destination moor ship in dock to Masters satisfaction, wash decks and get anchor on board. Crew to do all work required by Master during passage.”
The crew list for the passage to Newport, Monmouthshire, was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E. Robinson

28 - Sussex

Master

Same Ship

J. Robertson

52 - Dunkirk

Mate

Beewake

Alfred Delepirre

35 - Dunkirk

Cook/Steward

Charlwood

John Greene

20 - Philadelphia

AB

American Vessel

John Elleson

25 - Tyne

AB

American Vessel

[?]

31 - Dunkirk

AB

Charlwood

Adolphe Cleuter

35 - Paris

AB

J. T. North

T. Aliveira

44 - Lisbon

AB

Murrium

Tom Palmer

21 - Guernsey

AB

Murrium

Thomas Lewis

30 - Wales

AB

Viagem

Bleguet

37 - Dunkirk

AB

Foreign

 
Rates of pay were: -
 

RANK

WAGES PER
CALENDAR MONTH

ADVANCE
OF WAGES

Mate

£4 10s 0d

£2 5s 0d

Cook & Steward

£4 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

AB : Cleuter, Aliveira, Palmer, [?]

 £4 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

AB : Lewis

£2 10s 0d 

 
On the 15th July 1888, Bleguet signed on and was to receive £4 0s 0d per calendar month, with an advance of £2 0s 0d.
Luna who was 40 years old and from Bastia did not sail. His previous ship had been named ‘Murrium’. Against his name the Agreement showed ‘substitute engaged’.
‘Atossa’ reached Newport on the 22nd July 1888, where, being the first British port visited since the death of Edward Shepherd, the Deputy Superintendent of the Mercantile Marine Office, recorded in the Agreement, “I hereby certify that I have inquired into the cause of death of Edward Shepherd, Apprentice, as reported on pages 20 & 21 of official Log Book. Further, that I find no reason to doubt the truth of such entries. James Richards Deputy Superintendent 27th July 1888 Newport, Mon.”
‘Atossa’ had been away from the United Kingdom from the 26th October 1886 to the 22nd July 1888.
Joseph E. Robinson remained with the ship. All other crew members except the Mate, Robertson, were discharged on the 22nd July 1888, Robertson left the ship on the 25th July 1888.
They received the balances of wages:
Robertson
Delepirre
Greene
Elleson
[?]
Cleuter
Aliveira
Palmer
Lewis
Bleguet
£2 3s 8d
£1 8s 8d
£2 17s 5½d
£1  14s 4½d 
£2 0s 0d
£2 0s 0d
£2 0s 0d
£2 0s 0d
£2 8s 8d
£2 0s 0d
 
Rio De Janeiro, Barbados and Wilmington > >
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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