ATOSSA
 
 
Caribbean 1889
On 16th March 1889 Joseph E. Robinson signed the Agreement that would see ‘Atossa’ sail between “London and Guadeloupe & any ports or places within the limits of 70° North & 70° South Latitude to & fro for any period not exceeding Two years & back to the final port of discharge in the United Kingdom or Continent of Europe between the Elbe & Brest.” All crew members signed on.
The crew list was: -
 

NAME

AGE OR YEAR &
PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E Robinson

31 - Sussex

Master

Same Vessel

James Grevett

29 - Sussex

1st Mate

Same Vessel

Robert Ramsey

45 - N. Yorks

Bosun

Lyndon, Windsor

Stephen McGrath

21 - Auckland

Cook/Steward

Black Adder, London

Petter Benson

25 - Norway

Carpenter & AB

M Douglas, London

S A Abrahamson

33 - Sweden

AB

Queens Island, Belfast

James Flanagan

21 - Dublin

AB

Queens Island, Belfast

G Glanfield

39 - Norway

AB

Nile, London

Ole Olson

23 - Norway

AB

Norwegian Ship

Hugo Wessman

21 - Sweden

AB

Norwegian Ship

James Field

18 - Sussex

OS

Clarrisa, Shoreham

Sidney Day Robinson

16 - Sussex

Apprentice

-

 
The crew’s wages were: -
 

CAPACITY

MONTHLY
WAGE

MONTHLY
ALLOTMENT

1st Mate

£6 0s 0d

-

Bosun

£4 0s 0d

£2 10s 0d

Cook & Steward

£4 0s 0d

£2 0s 0d

Carpenter & AB

£3 10s 0d

£1 15s 0d

AB

£3 0s 0d

£1 10s 0d

OS

£2 0s 0d

£1 10s 0d

 
Provisions for each man mentioned in the Agreement were: -
1lb of bread every day.
1½lbs of beef on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
1¼lbs of pork on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb of flour on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
⅓ pint of peas on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
½lb rice on Saturdays.
A daily allowance of ⅛oz of tea.
A daily allowance of ½oz of coffee.
A daily allowance of 2ozs of sugar.
A daily allowance of 3 quarts of water.
Equivalent at Masters option.
Sidney Day Robinson became an Indentured Apprentice at Littlehampton two days before joining ‘Atossa’. On 14th March 1889 he became bound to a three year apprenticeship with his father, Joseph. Sidney was the second son of Joseph’s second marriage in 1869; to Harriet Day.
On 18th March 1889 ‘Atossa’ left home waters again bound for Guadeloupe in the eastern Caribbean Sea. She arrived there on 27th April 1889 and was in port until 24th May 1889 when she left for and took five days to reach St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands.
The ‘Dues and Charges on Shipping at Foreign Ports’ manual shows that exports from Guadeloupe included “Usine, sugar, coffee, cocoa, logwood, rum, molasses, annatto, vanilla, etc. all of which may be said to go to France. The principle Imports are – Coal, salt fish, breadstuffs, cement, tobacco, salt and preserved provisions, dry goods, earthenware, hardware, fertilizers, rice, lumber, sugar, shooks and bags, hoops, wire, beer, cheese, butter, soap, olive and kerosene oils, horses, mules, cattle, galvanised iron roofing, matches, etc.”
St. Thomas was shown in the same manual as “in lat. 18.19.22 N., long. 64.55.8 W. Charlotte Amalie, the capital of the island, is the only commercial port of entry. The town is most picturesquely situated along the northern shore of the harbour, and on the sides of three remarkable rounded spurs, which branch off to the southward from the main and mountain ridge. It is the safest and most convenient port of call in the West Indies. Exports – Bay Rum. Imports – General merchandise.
 
Charlotte Amalie, St Thomas 1890
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas 1890
Courtesy of Caribbean Photo Archive
 
‘Atossa’ remained in St. Thomas from 29th May 1889 until the 7th June 1889.
On 21st July 1889. ‘Atossa’ reached Wilmington, North Carolina.
On 22nd July 1889 the Acting British Vice-Consul William H. Sprunt endorsed the ships Articles. He wrote, “Agreement deposited on arrival 21st July and this day returned to Master. The within named S. A. Abrahamson, Ole Olson, S. Flanagan, Hugo Wessman were reported to me as having deserted the vessel taking their effects with them. I have seen proper entries of same in ship log. I have sanctioned the engagement of the within named Joseph White, H. Hannaford, Henri Aro & William Riedelmann who have signed the agreement in my presence with a full understanding of its terms and conditions.”
The crew list for the journey from Wilmington to London was: -
 

NAME

AGE & PLACE OF BIRTH

RANK

PREVIOUS SHIP

Joseph E Robinson

31 - Sussex

Master

Same Vessel

James Grevett

29 - Sussex

1st Mate

Same Vessel

Robert Ramsey

45 - N. Yorks

Bosun

Lyndon, Windsor

Stephen McGrath

21 - Auckland

Cook/Steward

Black Adder, London

Petter Benson

25 - Norway

Carpenter & AB

M Douglas, London

G Glanfield

39 - Norway

AB

Nile, London

Joseph White

34 - Chelsea, Massachusetts

AB

American Ship

H. Hannaford

22 - London

AB

American Ship

Henri Aro

25 - Finland

AB

American Ship

William Riedelmann

31 - Germany

AB

American Ship

James Field

18 - Sussex

OS

Clarrisa, Shoreham

Sidney Day Robinson

16 - Sussex

Apprentice

-

 
‘Atossa’ arrived at Millwall Docks, London from Wilmington on the 23rd August 1889. All crew members were discharged that day.
Whilst the ship was in London ownership passed from Joseph Robinson to Henry Langridge.
Henry Langridge was born in Mereworth, Kent and baptised there on 11th May 1836. His parents were Thomas Langridge and Eleanor Langridge (nee Barton). In 1861, Thomas was a Farmer of 194 acres, employing 21 men and 4 boys at Barons Place, Mereworth.
Henry married Flora Jane Pope on 17th September 1861 at All Saints Church, St. John’s Wood, London. At this time he gave his occupation as ‘Merchant’.
The following year, the first of their eight children, George Thomas was born. Their other children were: - Edith (1864); Arthur Bracy (1865); Marion Emily (1868); Francis Barton (1870); Helen Cecile Dorothea (1871); Winnifred (1873); and Gwenllian Maude (1875).
 
Henry Langridge
Henry Langridge
ancestry.co.uk
 
George Thomas Langridge was born on 27th August 1862 and baptised at All Saints Church, St. John’s Wood, and London on 8th October that year.
On 23rd October 1864 Henry applied to become a Freeman of the City of London. His application read, “I Henry Langridge (son of Thomas Langridge of Mereworth, Kent) occupying premises at 29, Great St. Helens and carrying on the business of a merchant do hereby apply to be admitted to Freedom of the City of London, by redemption, in pursuance of the Resolutions of the Court of Common Council of the 17th March, 1835, 13th July, 1848, 6th October, 1856, 22nd January, 1857, and 16th December, 1858 and some or one of the said Resolutions; and I hereby declare that I am not an Alien, and that I am above the age of Twenty-one years.”
Throughout 1870 proceedings were conducted regarding the liquidation of a partnership between John Anderson Wright and Henry Langridge, who had carried on business as Wright & Langridge, Shipbrokers, Insurance Brokers, Commission Agents and General Agents at 29, Great St. Helens, London, E. C.
At the time of the 1871 census, Henry, described as a merchant and shipbroker, was living at Stafford Cottage, Cheam, with his wife, Flora Jane and children; Marion Emily, Francis Barton and Helen Cecile Dorothea.
In 1879 the ‘Freeman of the City of London’ matter re-surfaced when a document was issued. It read, “A Court of Mayor and Aldermen holden in the inner chamber of the Guildhall in the City of London, on Tuesday, 22nd day of July 1879, and in the 43rd year of the reign of VICTORIA, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, etc. This day, upon reading the application of Henry Langridge and it appearing that the applicant was, on 28th day of October 1864 admitted to the Freedom of this City by Redemption, under the special order of the Court of Common Council on the 6th day of October 1856 without the intervention of a Company, and that he is now desirous of being recorded a Freeman of this City in the Company of Makers of Playing Cards and having produced his admission into the said Company of Makers of Playing Cards. It is ordered that the Chamberlain do accordingly record the said Henry Langridge a Freeman of this City in the said Company of Makers of Playing Cards.”
The 1881 census showed Henry Langridge as a guest at the Exeter Hotel, Holdenhurst, Bournemouth.
 
Grevett as Master > >
 
The Story Begins Absent Crew and Flying Jib 1872-1873 Rio De Janeiro, Barbados & Wilmington
The Construction of Atossa Swansea to Valparaiso and return 1873 James Grevett
The Shipbuilding Thompson Family The 1874 and 1875 Voyages The Caribbean 1889
The Mercantile Navy List 1864 A Change of Master 1876 Grevett as Master
The First Master and Crew New Owner and New Ports 1877 The 1890/1891 Survey
Dover to Valparaiso 1863-1864 Sugar and Onboard Offences The Final Voyage
Peru and Wales Demerara and London 1878-1879 Places Index
Chile and back 1864-1865 The Far Side of the World 1879-1881 Place Connections
Clements becomes Master South Africa and India 1881-1882 Surnames Index
Official Log Entries 1866-1867 The Robinson Family Ships Index
Return to Chile 1867 Ceylon and New York 1882-1883 Map of Chile
Chile Again 1868-1869 Brazil and India 1883-1884 Sources
Swansea to Coquimbo return 1869-1870 Cape Verde and the West Indies 1885  
Chile and New York 1870-1871 October 1885 to October 1886  
South America and Europe 1871 Twenty-One Months Away © atossa.uk 2020
 
 
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